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Yom Rivii, 4 Elul 5778
  • Engaging All Generations
    Engaging All Generations
  • Engaged Volunteers
    Engaged Volunteers Active Brotherhood, Sisterhood and Chai Club
  • Music for All Ages
    Music for All Ages Junior Choir, Adult Choir, Musical Services and more
  • Creating New Connections
    Creating New Connections Women's Seder, Bar Mitzvah Boot Camp for Dads, Life Long Learning
  • Engaging Worship
    Engaging Worship From classical Reform to contemporary services
  • Learning Through Fun
    Learning Through Fun
  • A Welcoming Community
    A Welcoming Community Tashlich in Oyster Bay
  • Engaging All Generations
  • Engaged Volunteers
  • Music for All Ages
  • Creating New Connections
  • Engaging Worship
  • Learning Through Fun
  • A Welcoming Community

Get Connected

Shabbat in the Park

Shabbat in the Park 2018July 27th at 5:30pm

Pack a picnic Shabbat Dinner as North Shore Synagogue creates a Shabbat experience in the park, Join Rabbi Shalhevet & Rabbi Maimin at Picnic Area A.

Syosset-Woodbury Park
7800 Jericho Turnpike, Woodbury
(across from Fox Hollow Catering Hall)

For those who do not come to the park There will be a Shabbat Service at North Shore Synagogue, at 7:30pm.

Our Amazing Religious School - Now More Affordable Than Ever!

NewRS2018 2019C

Mitzvah of the Month

Tzedakah of the Month - The July/August Tzedakah of the Month is Sunrise Day Camp-Long Island. Sunrise Day Camp-Long Island is the world’s first full-summer day camp for children with cancer and their siblings, provided completely free of charge. And because Sunrise is a day camp, it does all this while allowing the children to continue their medical treatment and enjoy the comfort and safety of their own homes at night. Sunrise Day Camp-Long Island is a proud member of the Sunrise Association, whose mission is to bring back the joys of childhood to children with cancer and their siblings world-wide, through the creation of Sunrise Day Camps, Year-Round Programs and In-Hospital Recreational Activities, all offered free of charge. Sunrise Day Camp-Long Island is a program of the Friedberg JCC, a beneficiary agency of UJA-Federation of New York. Kindly give generously as the money collected in the Tzedakah boxes during the months of July and August will go to this cause.


We thank you again for your efforts and support,
Patrice Grossman & Ilene Zelniker
Tikkun Olam Co-Chairs


Ongoing Mitzvahs

Food Collection - Help fight hunger and poverty locally by dropping off your boxed or canned good donations with a current “best by” date to the bin in the Religious School Hallway.

Clothing Donations
- Goodwill box located outside in rear of parking lot (receipts can be obtained in the office for donations).

Get Well Mugs -  Make someone smile…“Get Well Mugs” filled with a coupon for “Jewish Penicillin” (chicken soup) from Ben’s Deli. Just call the office to have one shipped to a friend or family member who is under the weather. ($12)


Volunteers needed to deliver Shiva Baskets to those sitting shiva

Volunteers needed to lead Shiva Minyans

Please call the main office at 516-921-2282 to sign up to volunteer.

Tikkun Olam Committee Co-Chairs:
Patrice Grossman and Ilene Zelniker

Photo Gallery

TBE NSS263  800x533 -29-150-120-80-c Take a look at photos from different events, occasions, and happenings here at our synagogue. Our Mitzvah Day celebrations, Tikkun Olam, simchas and special occasions!

Click the photo to see our current photo gallery!

Our "Shalom" Newsletter

NewsletterRead more about what's going on in our synagogue and community. North Shore Synagogue's Shalom bulletin is published monthly.

You can find it here!

Upcoming Events

17Aug
08.17.2018 7:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Congregational Shabbat Service
18Aug
08.18.2018 8:45 am - 10:00 am
Torah Study
18Aug
08.18.2018 10:30 am - 11:30 am
Service in the Round
24Aug
08.24.2018 7:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Congregational Shabbat Service
25Aug
08.25.2018 8:45 am - 10:00 am
Torah Study
25Aug
08.25.2018 10:30 am - 11:30 am
Service in the Round
31Aug
08.31.2018 7:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Congregational Shabbat Service
1Sep
09.01.2018 8:45 am - 10:00 am
Torah Study
1Sep
09.01.2018 10:30 am - 11:30 am
Service in the Round
1Sep
09.01.2018 5:30 pm - 8:00 pm
Selichot Dinner and Discussion
1Sep
09.01.2018 8:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Selichot Service
7Sep
09.07.2018 7:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Congregational Shabbat Service
8Sep
09.08.2018 8:45 am - 10:00 am
Torah Study
8Sep
09.08.2018 10:30 am - 11:30 am
Service in the Round
9Sep
09.09.2018 8:00 pm - 9:30 pm
Erev Rosh Hashanah Service
10Sep
09.10.2018 8:30 am - 11:15 am
Rosh Hashanah Early Service
10Sep
09.10.2018 11:45 am - 2:30 pm
Rosh Hashanah Late Service
10Sep
09.10.2018 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Rosh Hashanah Family Services
11Sep
09.11.2018 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
Rosh Hashanah 2nd Day Services
11Sep
09.11.2018 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Tashlich at Teddy Roosevelt Park

*The History and Origins of Passover
Pesach, known as Passover in English, is a major Jewish spring festival, commemorating the Exodus from Egypt over 3,000 years ago.

The ritual observance of this holiday centers around a special home service called the seder (meaning "order") and a festive meal; the prohibition of chametz (leaven); and the eating of matzah (an unleavened bread). On the eve of the fifteenth day of Nisan in the Hebrew calendar, we read from a book called the hagaddah, meaning "telling," which contains the order of prayers, rituals, readings and songs for the Pesach seder. The Pesach seder is the only ritual meal in the Jewish calendar year for which such an order is prescribed, hence its name.

The seder has a number of scriptural bases. Exodus 12:3-11 describes the meal of lamb, unleavened bread, and bitter herbs which the Israelites ate just prior to the Exodus. In addition, three separate passages in Exodus (12:26-7, 13:8, 13:14) and one in Deuteronomy (6:20-21) enunciate the duty of the parents to tell the story of the Exodus to their children. The seder plate contains various symbolic foods referred to in the seder itself.

The story of Joseph gives us the background for how our people ended up in Egypt. It begins with our patriarch Jacob and his 12 sons. One of the sons, Joseph, was the most favored by his father, which caused tension between Joseph and his brothers, who sold him into slavery. The brothers told Jacob that a wild animal had killed Joseph. In truth, Joseph ended up in Egypt where he had many adventures, one of which landed him in jail.Through his ability to interpret dreams, Joseph became an advisor to Pharaoh, managing the country's food supply so that the people would be fed during the predicted seven years of famine.The famine extended into the land of Canaan where Jacob and his family lived. Joseph's brothers went down to Egypt in search of food and came before Joseph, but they did not recognize him. Eventually Joseph identified himself to his brothers and invited them and the entire household of Jacob to come down to Egypt so they would survive the famine.

Many generations later, a new Pharaoh arose "who knew not Joseph." This Pharaoh enslaved the Hebrews and ordered all of their newborn baby boys killed.A newborn, Moses, was saved by the ingenuity of his mother and sister when he was set adrift in a basket in the Nile. As his sister Miriam watched, she saw that Pharaoh's daughter discovered the baby and decided to raise the Hebrew child as her own. Miriam offered to arrange for a Hebrew nurse (Moses' mother) to feed and care for the child.

Moses grew up, and one day he witnessed an Egyptian overseer beating a Hebrew slave. So angered by this sight, Moses killed the overseer. Subsequently, he saw two Hebrew slaves arguing and tried to stop them.They turned to him, and one said,"Will you kill me as you killed the Egyptian overseer?" Realizing that there was a witness to the murder and becoming concerned for his life,Moses escaped into the desert. On that journey, God appeared to Moses in a burning bush that was not consumed, and told him to go back to Egypt and deliver the Hebrews from slavery.

With his brother Aaron, Moses went before Pharaoh to demand that the Hebrews be set free. Pharaoh continually refused, and the plagues descended upon Egypt. With the 10th plague, the killing of the firstborn, Pharaoh relented and allowed the Hebrews to leave. In their haste, the Israelites took unleavened dough that baked on their backs into matzah.

The Passover Seder reminds us of our ancestor's journey down into Egypt, our enslavement there and our eventual flight to freedom. In Jewish tradition, because of the centrality of this story, we are not simply to remember these events but to recount them as if we ourselves had experienced them.

Content provided by URJ

Find more Pesach resources on our website.

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